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Commercial Club 
of Chicago 



®rflani3e^ 1878 



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Conetitution 

3fot tbe purpose of aOrancing bs social 
intercourse an& bg a frienDlgintercbangeot 
views, tbe commercial prosperit^g anD growtb 

of tbe cits of CbicagO, tbe Commercial 

Club is berebg organiseO, anO tbe following 
articles of association are agreed to : 

H. trbe Club sball consist of tbose b^ 
wbom tbis constitution is frameO, and of 
sucb otber members as sball bereafter be 
aDmitteO, proviDeb tbat tbe active mem» 
bersbip sball in no case eiceeb tbe num» 
ber of silts— but members wbo, bs removal 
from tbe citg, cease to be residents, ma^, 
bg vote of tbe Executive Committee, become 
nonsresiDent members of tbe Club, anD 
members of tbe Club wbo bave in ang was 
become permanently unable to attend tbe 
meetings of tbe Club mag, bs a similar vote, 
become retired members, and ans member 
of tbe Club wbo bas reacbed tbe age of siitg* 
five sears, mas, upon bis own request, and 
witb tbe consent of tbe ^Executive Com* 
mittee, become a retired member, and sball 
be exempt from pasment of all dues, except 
for sucb meetings as be desires to attend. 



>v^ .^it 



Constitution 

1Won»rc6(Dent anJ) tetireD members sball not 
be entitled to vote, ^be limit ot membersbip 
nameJ) in tbis section sball applg onli2 to 
active members. 

fllF. Zbc officers sball consist of a iPresi* 
Dent, a lUice*lpresi&ent, a Secretary anO a 
treasurer, wbo, witb tbree otber members, 
sball constitute an Eiecutive Committee, 
^beg sball be elected at tbe 5anuarg 
meeting. 

HHH. IRominations for membersbip sball 
be made to tbe Biecutive Committee, and, if 
approved bs tbem, sball be reported to tbe 
Club bs tbeir names being placed on tbe 
notices of tbe neit meeting after sucb 
approval, and sball be balloted for at tbat 
meeting for election. Jfive votes in tbe nega* 
five sball eiclude a candidate for admission, 
an entrance fee of ffive Dollars sball be paid 
on admission. 

HID. XLbe Club sball meet montblg, com* 
mencing in ©ctober and ending in Bpril, and 
on tbe last Saturday of tbe montb, eicept at 
sucb times as tbe jEiecutive Committee mas 
tbink it advisable to cbange tbe dais, wben 



Constitution 

tbeg sball bave autboritg to do so. ZTbc 
place of meeting sball be DesignateJ) b^ tbem. 

ID. 21ns member, witb tbe permission of 
tbe jEiecutive Committee, mag invite one 
0uest to attend eacb meeting of tbe Club, but 
no guest sball be present on tbe invitation of 
tbe same member on more tban two occasions 
during tbe Club ijear except bg special invi* 
tation of tbe Club itself. 

ItJIF. Bng member absenting bimself from 
tbree consecutive meetings of tbe Club vvitbs 
out sending a satisfactory eiplanation to tbe 
Secretary, sball be considered as having 
witbdrawn from tbe membersbip and bis 
name ma^ be stricften from tbe rolls bg tbe 
jEiecutive Committee. 

IDHH. Iln tbe admission of members, due 
regard sball be bad, so far as practicable, to 
tbe branch of business in wbicb tbeg are 
engaged, so tbat tbe various commercial 
interests of tbe citg sball be fairlg repre* 
sented in tbe Club. 

lt)1F1I1[. Bn assessment of Siitg Dollars 
sball be made at tbe beginning of eacb \?ear, 
on eacb member, to defray tbe expenses of 



Constitution 

tbe regular entertainments of tbe igcat. ft 
gball be witbin tbe Discretion ot tbe J£iecu» 
tive Committee to Drop from tbe roll of mem* 
bersbip of tbe Club, ani? member wbo bas 
been Duli^ notified of Dues anD faileD to pag 
tbe same. 

Hi', mbenever, in tbe jubflment ot a 
majority of tbe members of tbis Club, 
betermineb bg vote at ang regular meeting, 
ani2 member sball be beemeb to bave bis* 
graceb btmself, or it sball be belb tbat bis 
furtber contlnueb membersbip woulb bis* 
grace tbe Club, It sball be competent for tbe 
Club, bs a majority vote of a II tbe members, 
to terminate sucb membersbip; provided. 
sucb person be given opportunlti? to appear 
at tbe neit meeting before final action is 
taften. 

I. Sverg member unable to attenb a 
regular meeting of tbe Club sball senb a 
written notice to tbe Secretary, giving tbe 
reason for intenbeb absence— sucb notice to 
be maileb or sent in time to reacb tbe Secre* 
targ bg tbe morning of tbe bag in wblcb tbe 
tegular meeting is belb. ang member failing 



Constitution 

to complin witb tbfs rule or wbosc reason for 
non*attenDance ma^ be unsatisfactory to tbe 
JEiecutlve Committee sball be flneD ^en 
Dollars. /iBeetings of tbe Club sball talie 
precedence of all social engagements. 

fff. tTbese articles ma^ be altered or 
amenbeb bg a twostbirbs vote of tbe mem= 
bers present at an^ meeting of tbe Club; 
notice of tbe proposed amendment bavlng 
been given at a previous meeting. 



1Rctire^ flRembers will receive notice from tbe Secretary 
of aU meetings, but must advise blm if tbeig inten^ to be 
present, otherwise no place at tbe table will be reserxle^ for 
tbem. Ubeig will be entitles to invite a guest ane will paie tbe 
regular cbarge for Sinner. 



Xist ot ©meets 



From Organization to Date 

IS78 

President Levi Z. Leiter 

Fice-Presidevt John W. Doane 

Treasurer Murry Nelson 

Secretary George C. Clarke 

Executive Committee 
Anson Staler Edson Keith 

William T. Baker 

1879 

President John W. Doane 

Vice-President Anson Stager 

Treasurer Murry Nelson 

Secretary George C. Clarke 

Executive Committee 

Edson Keith Otho S. A. Sprague 

James W. Oakley 

1880 

President ]°^^ W. Doane 

Vice-President Nathaniel K. Fairbank 

Treasurer Murry Nelson 

Secretary George C. Clarke 

Executive Committee 

Henry J. Macfarland Franklin MacVeagn 

Augustus A. Carpenter 

8 



%i3t of ©fficers 



1881 

President Orrin W. Potter 

Vice-Prehident Albert A. Sprague 

Treasurer Murry Nelson 

Secretary George C. Clarke 

Executive Committee 

Henry J. Macfarland John M. Clark 

James H. Walker 

1882 

President Albert A. Sprague 

Vice-President Murry Nelson 

Treasurer William T. Baker 

Secretary George C. Clarke 

Executive Committee 

George C. Walker Elbridge G. Keith 

William A. Fuller 

18S3 

President Augustus A. Carpenter 

Vice-President Marvin Hughitt 

Treasurer Anthony F. Seeberger 

Secretary George C. Clarke 

Executive Committee 

John Crerar Richard T. Crane 

Erskine M. Phelps 

9 



ILlst of ©fficets 



18S4 



President John M. Clark 

Vice-President George M. Pullman 

Treasurer Anthony F. Seeberger 

Secretary George C. Clarke 

Executive Committee 

Byron P. Moulton Adolphus C. Bartlett 

John J. Janes 

tS85 

President Franklin MacVeagh 

Fice-Presidenl George M. Pullman 

Treasurer John B. Drake 

Secretary George C. Clarke 

Executive Committee 

John DeKoven Lyman J. Gage 

Thomas Murdoch 

1886 

President Lyman J. Gage 

yice-President .... Adolphus C. Bartlett 

Treasurer Louis Wampold 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Alexander C. McClurg Charles Fargo 

Cyrus H. McCormick, Jr. 

10 



XiBt of ©fHcere 



1887 

President Adolphus C. Bartlett 

yics-President Eliphalet W. Blatchford 

Treasurer Charles L. Hutchinson 

Secretary John J- Janes 

Executive Committee 

Marshall Field Otho S. A. Sprague 

J. Harley Bradley 

1888 

President Eliphalet W. Blatchford 

Vtce-President Charles L. Hutchinson 

Treasurer William Munro 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Charles B. Holmes James L. Houghteling 

William E. Strong 

1889 

President Charles L. Hutchinson 

Vice-President Elbridge G. Keith 

Treasurer William Munro 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Henry H. Porter William G. Hibbard 

William E. Strong 

11 



Hist of ©fficers 



1890 

President Elbridge G. Keith 

Vice-President .... Marvin Hughitt 

Treasurer William Munro 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Philip D. Armour Turlington W. Harvey 

John J. Glessner 

1891 

President Marvin Hughitt 

Vice-President .... Turlington W. Harvey 

Treasurer Harlow N.Higinbotham 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Edward E. Ayer Eugene Gary 

Martin A. Ryerson 

1892 

President Turlington W. Harvey 

Vice-President Alexander C. McClurg 

Treasurer Henry J. Macfarland 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Henry W. King Norman B. Ream 

William H. Rand 

12 



Xist of ©fficcrs 



1893 

President Alexander C. McClurg 

Vice-President .... William T. Baker 

Treasurer Henry J. Macfarland 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Franklin H. Head Christoph Hotz 

Francis B. Peabody 

1894 

President William T. Baker 

Vice-President John B. Drake 

Treasurer Henry J. Macfarland 

Secretary J"hn J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Francis B. Peabody Otho S. A. Sprague 

Henry B. Stone 

1895 

President Henry W. King 

Vice-President George C. Walker 

Treasurer Henry J. Macfarland 

Secretary Jolin J- Janes 

Executive Committee 

Erskine M. Phelps Louis Wampold 

Robert A. Waller 



13 



list of ©meets 



1896 

President Francis B. Peabody 

Vice-Preiident Henry B. Stone 

Treasurer Henry J. Macfarland 

Secretary Jol^i J- Janes 

Executive Committee 

Charles B. Farwell Melville E. Stone 

William J. Chalmers 

1807 

President Jo^m J- Glessner 

Vice-President Eugene Cary 

Treasurer Henry J. Macfarland 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

William A. Fuller Cyrus H. McCormick 

J. Harley Bradley 

1898 

President Eugene Cary 

Vice-President Cyrus H. McCormick 

Treasurer Henry J. Macfarland 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

William A. Fuller John M. Clark 

Robert. C. Clowry 

14 



list of ©CHcers 



1899 

President Cyrus H. McCormick 

Vice-President H.N. Higinbotham 

Treasurer H.J. Macfarland 

Secretary Jotn J. Janes 

Kxecutive Committee 

Elbridge G. Keith Albert A. Sprague 

H. H. Kohlsaat 

1900 

President William J. Chalmers 

Vice-President Martin A. Ryerson 

Treasurer Henry J Macfarland 

Secretary John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

Marshall Field Edward B. Butler 

David B. Jones 

1901 

President William A. Fuller 

Vice-President David B. Jones 

Treasurer Henry J Macfarland 

Secretary ..... John J. Janes 

Executive Committee 

James L. Houghteling Edward P. Ripley 

Rollin A. Keyes 

16 



%i6t of ©fficeca 



1902 



President David B. Jones 

yice-President Edward E. Ayer 

Treasurer Charles F. Kimball 

^cretary Rolliri A. Keyes 

Executive Committee. 

Adolphus C. Bartlett John A. Spoor 

John V. Farwell, Jr. 

1903 

President Martin A. Ryerson 

Vice-President J. Harley Bradley 

Treasurer Charles F. Kimball 

Secretary Rollin A. Keyes 

Executive Committee. 

Thies J. Lefens Albert J. Earling 

James H. Eckels. 

1904 

President J. Harley Bradley 

Vice-President Edward B. Butler 

Treasurer Charles F. Kimball 

Secretary Rollin A. Keyes 

Executive Committee 

George E. Adams Byron L. Smith 

Charles H. Wacker 



ILlst of /Dbembcrs 



1899 Adams, George E Real Estate 

1901 Armour, J. Ogden . . . Pres. Armour & Co. 

1889 Ayer, Edward E. . . . Ayer & Lord Tie Co. 

1882 Bartlett, Adolphus C. 

Pres. Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co. 

1898 Barton, Enos M. . Pres. Western Electric Company 
188 1 Bradley, J. Harley . Pres. David Bradley Mfg. Co. 

1901 Brown, William L. . Pres. American Ship Bldg. Co. 

1899 Buckingham, Clarence . . John H. Wrenn & Co. 

1900 Burnham, Daniel H Architect 

1897 Butler, Edward B. . . . Pres. Butler Brothers 
1903 Carpenter, Benjamin . . Geo. B. Carpenter & Co. 

1 90 1 Carter, Leslie . Pres. South Side Elevated R. R. Co. 
1887 Cary, Eugene . . Mgr. German-American Ins. Co. 
1894 Chalmers, William J. . . Pres. AUis-Chalmers Co. 
1877 Clark, John M. . Chairman Chicago Telephone Co. 
1899 Earling, Albert J. . , Pres. C. M. & St. P. R'y 

1899 Eckels, James H. . Pres. Commercial National Bank 

1898 Eckhart, Bernard A., Pres. Eckhart& Swan MTg Co. 
1898 Farwell,John V.,Jr. . . Treas. J. V. Farwell Co. 
1877 Field, Marshall . . . . Marshall Field & Co. 

1902 Forgan, James B Pres. First Nat. Bk. 

1877 Fuller, William A 171 LaSaUe St. 

1884 Glessner, John J. 

Vice- Pres. Warder, Bushnell & Glessner Company 

1902 Hamill, Ernest A. . . . Pres. Corn. Ex. Nat. Bk. 
1889 Head, Franklin H. . Room 1 107, 134 Monroe St. 
1887 Higinbotham, Harlow N. Room 513 The Rookery. 
1884 Houghteling, James L., Peabody, Houghteling & Co. 

1878 Hughitt, Marvin . Pres C. & N. W. R'y Co. 

1900 Hulburd, Charles H., Pres. Elgin National Watch Co, 

17 



Hist of flibcmbers 



1882 Hutchinson, Charles L. 

Vice-Pres. Corn Exchange National Bank 

1903 InsuU, Samuel . . . Pres. Chicago Edison Co. 

1898 Jones, David B. . Pres. Mineral Point Zinc Co. 

1900 Keep, Chauncey . Vice-Pres. Raymond Lead Co. 

1899 Keyes, Rollin A. Franklin MacVeagh & Co. 
1879 Keith, Elbridge G., Pres. Chicago Title & Trust Co. 

1897 Kimball, Charles F. 

Pres. and Treas. C. P. Kimball & Co. 

1 89 1 Kohlsaat, Herman H. . H. H. Kohlsaat Company 

1899 Lawson, Victor F. Pres. Chicago Daily News Co. 

1898 Lefens, Thies J Real Estate 

1898 Lincoln, Robert T., Pres. The Pullman Company 

1885 McCormick, Cyrus H., Pres. International HarvesterCo. 

1877 Macfarland, Henry J. . . M. D. Wells & Co. 

1878 MacVeagh, Franklin . Franklin MacVeagh & Co. 
1898 Mitchell, John J. Pres. 111. Trust & Savings Bank 

1 90 1 Morton, Joy .... Joy Morton & Co. 

1887 Peabody, Francis B. . Peabody, Houghteling & Co. 
1878 Phelps, Erskine M. . . . 34 Wabash Ave. 

1890 Ream, Norman B The Rookery 

1898 Ripley, Edward P. . . Pres. A. T. & S. F. R'y 

1888 Ryerson, Martin A. . . . 204 Dearborn St. 
1901 Shedd, JohnG. . . . Marshall Field & Co. 

1898 Smith, Byron L. . . Pres. Northern Trust Co. 

1899 Spoor, John A. Pres. U. S. Yards and Transit Co. 

1877 Sprague, Albert A. . . Sprague, Warner & Co. 
1901 Swift, Louis F. . . Pres. Swift and Company 
1898 Wacker, Charles H Real Estate 

1878 Walker, George C Real Estate 

1903 Warren, William S. . Pres. Hulburd, Warren Co. 



'Keticed /Ibembecs 



Blatchford Eliphalet W. Murdoch, Thomas 

Carpenter, Augustus A. Nelson, Murry 

Crane, Richard T. Potter, Orrin W. 

Harvey, Turlington W Rand, William H. 



1Flon*1Rcsi&cnt Members 



Richard M. Bissell Hartford 

Andrew Brown New York 

William Chisholm Cleveland 

Robert C. Clowry New York 

John M. Durand New York 

A. J. Forbes-Leith Scotland 

Lyman J. Gage New York 

Levi Z. Leiter Washington, D. C. 

William Munro London 

Henry H. Porter New York 

Otho S. A. Sprague California 

Melville E. Stone New York 



flecrologg 

DIED 

Solomon A. Smith November, 1879 

Edward S. Stickney March, 1880 

James M. Walker January, 188 1 

Richard C. Meldrum April, 1881 

George Armour June> 188 1 

John C. Coonley October, 1882 

Charles P. Kellogg April, 1883 

Anson Stager March, 1885 

John W. McGenniss May, 1885 

George C. Clarke April, 1887 

Martin Ryerson September, 1887 

John Crerar October, 1889 

William E. Strong April, 1891 

Uri Balcom November, 1893 

John B. Drake November, 1895 

Charles M. Henderson January, 1896 

Edson Keith November, 1896 

James W. Oakley January, 1897 

Henry B. Stone July, 1897 

George M. Pullman October, 1897 

Louis Wampold February, 1898 

Henry W. King April, 1898 

John DeKoven April, 1898 

W. C. D. Grannis August, 1898 

Robert A. Waller February, 1899 

Charles Fargo October, 1900 

Philip D. Armour January, 1 90 1 

John Wesley Doane March, 1 90 1 

Alexander Caldwell McClurg .... April, 1 90 1 

John Spragins Hannah July, 190 1 

Anthony Frederick Sceberger .... July, 1901 

21 



•WecroloflB 



John James Janes 
Nathaniel Kellogg Fairbank 
Charles Benjamin Farwell 
William Taylor Baker 
William Gold Hibbard . 
Elias Taylor Watkins 
Christoph Hotz 
Hermon Beardsley Butler 



DIED 

August, 1901 

March, 1903 

September, 1903 

October, 1903 

October, 1903 

December, 1 90 3 

January, 1904 

February, 1904 



Subjects MscusseD at tbe several 
meetings of tbe Commercial Club 



187S 

January 19. The purpose, scope and best 
method of conducting this Club. 

jfebruars 16. Compromise with fraud. 
/IRarCb 30. The situation in our municipal affairs. 
Hpril 27. The situation in our municipal affairs. 
/Hba^ 29. Diversion of trade. 
©CtOber 26. Our city streets. 
movcmber 30. Taxation. 
December 28. Taxation. 



Subjects 2)iscus0eO 

1879 

Januarg 29. Our Club: Its past and future. 

ffebruarv 22. The Military, as protectors of 
property, local and National. 

/BbatCb 29. Legislative interference, congres- 
sional, state and municipal, with private rights. 

april 26. Should the higher schools be sup- 
ported bv public taxation. 

^a^ 31. Sunday laws : To what extend ought 
they to be enforced in the interest of a good 
municipal government and the welfare ot the 
citizens I 

©CtObcr 25. Discussion informal. 

"WOVCmbcr. Omitted. 

©eCCmbcr 6. Special, and dinner given to 
Gen. U. S. Grant on his return from his 
tour around the world. 

December. Omitted. 



Subjects 5)l0cus5eO 

1880 

^anuarg 31. Do we need a bankrupt law ? 

jfebruars 28. Our sewerage; the public system 
and that of our homes; what are the defects 
and the possible remedies? 

/IBarCb 27. Has Chicago not reached a period 
in its growth when special attention should be 
paid to the fostering of art, literature and science? 

Bprll 24. What is the best pavement for our 
s.treets and boulevards ? 

/Dba^ 29. Should not the commercial prosperity 
of great cities be attended by the cultivation 
of art, literature, science and comprehensive 
charities, and the establishment of art mu- 
seums, public libraries, industrial schools and 
free hospitals ? 

©CtOber 30. Nuisances afflicting Chicago; 
chiefly smoke, steam whistles and bad streets. 

"Movcmbet 27. The coming session of the Legis- 
lature; legislation needed ? 

December. Meeting omitted-^" Christmas." 



Subjects DlacusseD 

1881 
5anuaci3 29. The Club. 

JFebruar^ 26. Disposition of Chicago sewerage. 

/IRarcb 26. Our license laws and their bearing 
on the expenses of our city government. 

Bpril 30. The need of a half-holiday in Chi- 
cago. 

/Ilba^ 28. Our bridge system; its relation to 
commerce and the city's business interests. 

IROVember 26. Does punishment follow crime 
in this community? If not, why? 

December 31. The right of the State to inter- 
fere in the affairs of public corporations. 



Subjects 2)i8CU0seD 



ISS2 

January 2S. How can the city best raise suffi- 
cient revenue to efficiently carry on the different 
branches of its government? 

ffebruar^ 25. What can be done to suppress 
or check gambling in this city? 

^arCb 25. The need of a school for industrial 
training in Chicago. 

^Ptil 29. Consolidation oi our various charities 
under one system. 

^a^ 21* Special banquet in honor of the St. 
Louis and Cincinnati Commercial Clubs. 

©CtOber. Omitted. 

moVCmber 25. Paper read by Mr. Blatchford 
on the "Training School." 

2>ecember 30, Need of a State license law to 
regulate the sale of alcoholic and malt liquors. 



Subjects DiscusseO 

IS83 

JanuatlS 27. What is the most desirable method 
of increasing the revenue of the city, and to 
what extent should it be increased ? 

ipebruars 24. Use and abuse in the disposition 
of charities. 

/Ibarcb 30. The open and increasing immorality 
in this city ; can anything be done to lessen it r 

Bpril 2S. Need and practicability of a scheme 
to provide cheap and good houses for working 
people. 

^aS 26. Is it practical in matters of dispute 
in commercial transactions to substitute some 
system of arbitradon for reference to court 
and juries ? 

©CtObCt 27. Desirability at future reunions of 
Commercial Clubs in cities to set apart a por- 
tion of one day to discuss the commercial 
interests of the various cities represented by 
the Clubs. 

IHlOrcmber 24. Complimentary and farewell to 
Lieut. -Gen. P. H. Sheridan. 

2>ecember 29. Hennepin Canal. 



Subjects DiscusgeD 

1884 

January 26. Should the United States govern- 
ment undertake transmission of telegraphic mess- 
ages as they now undertake the transmission of 
letters by mail ? 

ffebruarg 23. What are the causes of the present 
depression of commercial and industrial interests r 

/IftatCb 29, Legisladve blackmail and municipal 
corruption : Cause and remedy. 

Bpril 26. Silver as money : What should be the 
position of the Government relative thereto? 

/IliaS 31.. What should be the character and limi- 
tations of instruction at public schools? 

©CtObCt 24. Informal ; principally in regard to 
Training Schools. 

"WOVembcr 29. Is speculation an injury or a 
benefit to the general business interests of the 
country ? 

December 27. Unemployed laborers: What 
obligations rest upon the city or citizens for their 
support ? What measures are practicable on the 
part of employers to diminish their numbers ? 
Can any plan of employment, pubUc or private, 
be devised that will provide them with at least 
a bare living? 



Subjecte 2)i6cus5CD 

1885 

3-anuars 31. December subject continued. 

Jebruar^ 28. What should be done to prepare 
for the possible advent of cholera the coming 
season ? 

/HbarCb. Omitted, in respect to memory of General 
Anson Stager. 

Bprll 25. Should nominations and appointments 
to municipal offices be made on business prin- 
ciples to the entire exclusion of partisan con- 
siderations ? 

/IRag 30. Should the citizens of Chicago make 
the necessary efforts to secure the location of the 
new Artillery School and Military Station near 
Chicago ? 

©CtObCC 31. What course of governmental action 
relative to gold and silver coinage will, if taken, 
best subserve our industrial and commercial 
interests ? 

IROvembcr 28. Ought the difference in freight 
rates between car lots and less than car lots be 
abolished ? 

December 26. The Press : Its power for good 
and evil. How can we promote the one and 
discourage the other ? 



Subjects DiscusseD 



1686 

5anuar^ 30. Our Club: Its past history; its future 
possibilities. 

JFebruarS 27. January subject continued. 

/IbarCb 27. Is it advisable for the citizens of 
Chicago to make the necessary efforts to secure 
the location of the new Artillery School and 
Military Station near Chicago? 

Bpril 24. The eight-hour movement; its ad- 
vantages, disadvantages, and probable results. 

flba^ 29. The late civil disorder; its causes and 
lessons. 

©CtOber 30. Abstracts of title. Cook County: 
Evils and dangers of present system: What 
reforms are needed? 

flovember 27. Social and industrial antago- 
nisms: What can be done to avert the evils they 
threaten? 

2)CCeinbcr IS. Drainage and water supply of 
the City of Chicago. 



Subjects 2)i0cussed 



1887 

3-anuarS 29. Our Club: Reflections, criticisms 
and suggestions. 

JFCbruarS 26. Bucket Shops and Pool Rooms; 
Their danger to the business interests of the city. 
How can they be suppressed? 

/IbatCb 26. The saloon in politics. 

Bprll 30. Should the theaters of Chicago be 

closed on Sundays? 

3unc 11. Special meeting and banquet to the 
Boston Commercial Club. 

©CtOber 29. Our duty, as citizens, to the State. 

■fflOVCmber 26. The Clubs of Chicago: Their 
influence in this city. 

December 31. American citizenship: What 
legislation, if any, is desirable to control the 
immigration of foreigners to this country? 



Subjccta 2)i0CU00cd 



1888 

January 28. Monopolies: Their effect upon 
the public. 

JFcbruarg 25. Commercial union with Canada. 

/natCb 31. What are the best means of prevent- 
ing pauperism and crime ? 

Bprll 28. Railroads: The obligations of the 
management to the stockholders, the employes 
and the public ? 

©CtOber 27. Sunday Laws : To what extent 
ought they to be enforced in the interest of good 
municipal government and the welfare of its 
citizens ? 

■November 24. Rapid transit for Chicago. 

2>CCCnibCt 31. The Interstate Commerce Law: 
Its effect upon the railroads and the business of 
the country since it has been in operation. 



Subjects DfscusscD 

1889 

Januarys 26. Our Club: What has it accom- 
plished ? What are our duties as members ? 

Jebruar^ 23. The indifFerence of the intellec- 
tual classes to politics; causes and remedies. 

/SbatCb 30. Legislative interference with vested 
and private rights. 

!Rpril 27. Reflections and criticisms upon the 
subjects and discussions during the past year. 

©CtObcr. Omitted, in respect to memory of 
John Crerar. 

IRovcmbcr 30. Social and economical aspects 
of the eight-hour movement. 

2)ecember 28. Employers and employed: Their 
relative rights and reciprocal duties. 



Subjects 2)iscu00eO 

1890 

5anuar^ 25. Public libraries: Their uses, in- 
fluence and administration. 

jfflbarcb 1. Manual Training: How to get it. 

/Siarcb 29. Do we need a bankrupt law? If 
so, what should be its main provisions .? 

Bpril 26. Nuisances afflicting Chicago, chiefly 
smoke, filthy streets and alleys. 

October 25. Has Chicago not reached that 
period when special attention should be given 
to the founding of art galleries and museums ? 
Will the World's Columbian Exposition be of 
any benefit to this city in that direction ? 

"Rovember 29, Is the cause of education best 
served by our present public school system ? 

December 27. What shall be done to obtain 
good municipal government for Chicago ? 



Subjecte ©tscusscO 

1891 

^anuarg 31. The relation of the colleges to the 
development of the Northwest, and the rela- 
tion of the business men to the colleges. 

Jebruar^ 28. How can the safety and comfort 
of our citizens and strangers be assured, and 
the city made more attractive during the 
World's Exposition? 

/Barcb 28. Our Citizen Soldiers: What obli- 
gations rest upon the State for their support ? 

Bpril. Omitted. 

©CtOber 31. Entertainment of the Boston, Cin- 
cinnati and St. Louis Clubs. 

flOVember 28. A World's Fair Memorial. 

December 26. Omitted. 



Subjects BiscusseO 
IS92 

3anuari2 30. The smoke nuisance. 

ffebruarg 22. Our country, and the influence 
of World's Fairs on commerce. 

^arcb 26. The situation in our municipal affairs. 

Sprit 30. Is it desu-able and feasible to elevate 
the tracks of the steam railroads within the city 
limits ? 

©CtObcr 29, The Allied Arts: As illustrated in 
the construction of the World's Columbian 
Exposition. 

IRovCmber 26, In view of a possible epidemic 
of cholera in Europe during the coming year, 
ought not Congress take immediate action 
restricting immigration ? 

3S[)CCeTnbCC 31, Social Science: How may indi- 
viduals be trained for their partnerships in the 
community ? 



Subjects 2)lscu66CD 



1893 

5anuars 28. The World's Columbian Exposi- 
tion: The relation of the departments to the 
advancement of industry, science and art. 

yebruariS 25. How can the cleanliness of this 
city be best promoted during the coming year? 

/Iftarcb 25. Would the administration of our 
state and municipal governments be improved if 
conducted under civil service reform law? 

Bpril 29. Nicaragua Canal: Its effects upon 
commerce. 

©CtOber 28. A review of the World's Fair, 
with reference to its permanent influences and 
results. (Meeting adjourned in consequence of 
assassination of Mayor Harrison. ) 

November 25. A review of the World's Fair, 
with reference to its permanent influences and 
results. 

December 30, What is the present duty of 
Chicago or its citizens towards its unemployed 
laborers ? 



Subjects DiscusseD 



1894 

January 27. Upon what terms should the city 
grant franchises for the use of its streets and 
alleys? 

jfCbruariS 27. Has the Interstate Commerce 
Law proved beneficial to the business interests 
of the country? 

^arcb 31. Will anti-option legislation by Con- 
gress be beneficial to the business interests ot 
the country? 

Bpril 28. Is International Bi-metalism practicable 
and desirable? 

©CtOber 27. Our currency: What are its defects? 
What remedies are practicable? Would a 
National Commission help promote reform? 

IROVCmber 24. How can the evils of our present 
system of taxing real and personal property and 
levying special assessments be reformed? 

December 29. What should be done with the 
Lake Front? 



Subjects 35)i0cusseD 



1895 

3anuari2 26. How can municipal reform be best 
promoted? 

J^ebruar^ 23. To hear report of committee 
appointed to visit Springfield in interest of 
municipal reform. 

/DbarCb 30. How shall municipal affairs be 
relieved from the strain of party affiliation so as 
to insure the perfect working of the merit 
system? 

Bpril. Omitted. Members absent. 

©CtObCr. Omitted. St. Louis excursion 23d 
and 24th. 

IRovember 30. Review of our recent trip to St. 
Louis. 

December 28. The financial situation in our 
municipal affairs. What is the remedy? 



Subjects Discussed 

1896 

3-anuars 25. What can be done to reform the 
inequalities of the present system of taxing real 
and personal property ? 

Ifebruar^ 29. What should be the settled policy 
of the United States in its relations to other 
powers? What is the reasonable construction 
of the Monroe Doctrine, and on what occasions 
should it be invoked? 

/nbarcb 28. What, if anything, can be done to 
more thoroughly safeguard the morals of the 
youth of this city ? 

Bpril 25. Civic reform. 

©CtOber 31. The Amendment to the Constitu- 
tion to be voted upon at the election of Novem- 
ber third ; the necessity for its adoption ; the 
reform to be accomplished under it. 

November 28. Charity Organization: The 
scheme and purpose of the work ; the necessity 
for its existence as a preventive of pauperism 
and crime. 

December 24. Our Facilities for Commerce : 
Should the river channel be widened and 
deepened ? 



Subjects ®fscu00e£) 



1897 

January 30. The Supreme Court of the United 
States: Its place and function in the govern- 
ment ; its permanence and independence are 
essential to the existence of the Republic. 

jFcbruar^ U. Special: Complimentary to Hon. 
Lyman J, Gage. 

/IRarcb 29. What can be done to make Chicago 
more attracdve? 

Spril 24. Should municipal elections be kept 
free from party politics? 

©CtOber 30. What change, if any, should be 
made in the system of assessment for taxadon ? 

■November 27. Would an Exposition Building 
on the lake front be of any advantage to Chicago? 

December. Omitted. Christmas. 



Subjects 2>i6CU66eD 

IS98 

5anuari2 29. The annexation of Hawaii. 

iFCbruar^ 26. The monetary commission and 
its work. 

^arcb 26. The significance of the coming 
municipal election. 

Bptil 30. The Cuban situation. 

©CtOber 29. The Philippine Islands: The duty 
and policy of the United States in reference 
thereto. 

IROVember 26. What I saw in India. Rev. 
John H. Barrows. 

©CCember 31. The need of Monetary Legis- 
lation, 



Subjects Discussed 



1899 

3-anuarS 28. What are Chicago's most urgent 
needs? 

JFebruarS 18. Open door in China: Compli- 
mentary to Lord Charles Beresford. 

^arcb 25. Our duty and responsibility toward 
juvenile offenders. 

/nbaiS 13. Electricity. Nikola Tesla. 

©CtOber 16. Complimentary banquet to the 
President of the United States. 

IWovcmber 25. Our municipal improvements: 
Those most needed and howr to obtain same. 

2)ecember 30. Our Club. 



Subjects Discu00C& 
1900 

3-anuari2 27. Liquid Air, Prof. Charles E. 

Tripler. 

JFcbruarg 24. How can juvenile offenders be 
cared for and reformed ? 

/Iftarcb 31. The effect of the non-enforcement 
of the law upon the development of the city and 
upon individual rights. 

Bpril 28. The Peace Conference at The Hague. 

October 27. Should the Federal Government 
appropriate funds for water storage and arid 
land reclamation ? 

IftOVember 24. Our Merchant Marine: What 
should be done to promote and encourage it ? 

December 29. Justice courts: What reforms 
are needed ? 



Subjects ©iscusseO 



1901 

5anuarS 26. The consideration of the report of 
the Committee appointed at the meeting held 
last April, to formulate a plan for the care of 
juvenile offenders. 

ffCbruar^ 22. The practicability of land colo- 
nization as a remedy for city congestion and 
consequent poverty and vice. 

/IbarCb 30. Omitted. 

BprtI 27. Complimentary to Mayor and Com- 
mon Council. 

©CtOber 26. Reciprocal trade with the Domin- 
ion of Canada. 

"Movembet 30. Taxation. 

December 28. Omitted. 



Subjects 2>isci\5set» 



1902. 
3-ailuai-B 25. The Isthmian Canal. 

GEORGE -S. MORISON, NEW YORK. 

REV. RICHARD U. HARLAN. 

ffebruarB 22. The Americanization of the 
World. 

FRANK A. VANDERLIP, NEW YORK. 

REV. JOHN G. K. McCLURE. 

/Ilbarcb 22. The financial aspect of the Chicago 
Public School question. 

JOHN S. MILLER, ELBRIDGE G. KEITH. 

REV. PLEASANT HUNTER. 

Bpril 26. Representation of Cook County in the 
Legislature. 

WALTER L. FISHER, EDGAR A. BANCROFT, JOHN 
H. HAMLINE, A. C. BARTLETT. 

REV. FRANK Du.VlOULlN. 

©CtOber 25. Our relations with Cuba. 

GEN. JAMES H. WILSON, U. S. A. 

REV. HERBERT L. WILLETT. 

■Wovember 29. The relation of University Edu- 
cation to Commerce. 

PRESIDENT WOODROW WILSON, PRINCETON 
UNIVERSITY. 

REV. WILLIAM R. NOTMAN. 

December 27. The Louisiana purchase: Its 
purpose and scope. 

HON. D. R. FRANCIS, ISAAC S. TAYLOR, F. J. V. 
SKIFF, ISAAC W. MORTON, WM. T. BAKER, 
H. N. HIGINBOTHAM. 

REV. THADUEUS A. SNIVELY. 



Subjects DiscusBco 



1903, 
5anuarB 31, Twenty-fifth anniversary. 

A. C. BARTLETT, A. A. SPRAGUE, MURRY 
NELSON, WILLIAM T. BAKER, ERSKINE M. 
PHELPS, JOHN M. CLARK, GEORGE C. WALKER, 
FRANKLIN MAC VEAGH. 

BISHOP CHENEY. 

jfebruarg 28. Is the college an efficient insti- 
tution? 

DR. HENRY S. PRITCHETT, PRESIDENT OF THE 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. 
REV. FRANK W. GUNSAULUS. 

/Iftarcb 28. The proposed Constitutional Amend- 
ment. 

JOHN M. CLARK, H. S. MECARTNEY, 
E. ALLEN FROST, JOHN S. MILLER, B. E. SUNNY, 
REV. THADDEUS A. SNIVELY. 

Bpril 25. How may Chicago be made more 
interesting and attractive .? 

FRANKLIN MAC VEAGH, FLETCHER DOBYNS, 
DANIEL H. BURNHAM, 

REV. Z. B. PHILLIPS. 

©CtOber 14. American good citizenship. 

HONORABLE GROVER CLEVELAND, 

REV. FRANK W. GUNSAULUS. 



■November 28. The Alaskan boundarv case 

HONORABLE JACOB M. 
REV. 

December 26. Omitted 



HONORABLE JACOB M. DICKINSON, 

REV. WILLIAM O. WATERS. 



5anuars 30. 
J'ebruarg 27. 
/iRarcb 26. 
nvvil 30. 
©ctober 29. 
IRovember 26. 
Weccmbcv 31. 



Subjects 2)l6cu60eO 
1904